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1 week ago
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In the segment of Show Us Your Shot, Director Roderick E. Stevens and Cinematographer Daniel Gonsalez, in an effort to accentuate the grounded reality of their hero's journey in the latter half of the film, chose to mix shooting styles and formats, including Super 8 film for the opening flashback scenes, 4k RAW (on a Sony F55) for the first half of the roadtrip with the two brothers, and 35mm (...
1 week ago
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Steven Gladstone: You wear many different hats—writer, producer, director, actor, etc. Do you go by Filmmaker, or is there a distinction? Gregory Blair: If I’m relegated to a single label, I use “Entertainment Professional,” because it is generic and inclusive enough to represent my writing consulting, TV, and theatre work in addition to my various roles in the film industry. SG: How long have...
1 month ago
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Making a complete film that lasts only a minute takes far more time to shoot and edit. Kelly Murray and Hillary Hanak opened up to me about what was involved in making the one-minute-long horror film, 3:13. Steven Gladstone: How long have you been working in the industry, and how did you get started? Kelly Murray: I've been working in film for seven years, since 2012. Growing up, I was involved...
1 month ago
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I had the opportunity to catch up with Jillian Bullock, the filmmaker and creative force behind A Sense of Purpose: Fighting for Our Lives, and she shared some thoughts on making the film and the filmmaking process in general. Steven Gladstone: How long have you been working in the industry, and how did you get started? Jillian Bullock: I’ve been in the industry since 1991 when I graduated from...
1 month ago
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In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Jillian Bullock filmed a scene in Fairmount Park, in Philadelphia, in the summer: “We headed out early to beat the heat, but we had a problem with the DJI Ronin Gimbal, which wasn’t cooperating. This meant we had to do more takes of the scene. I made sure we had plenty of water bottles available for cast and crew. More care was given to the lead...
2 months ago
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The filmmakers behind Clickbait, Michael Epstein and Sophia Cacciola (collectively Filmmakers), share some thoughts on their film and filmmaking. Steven Gladstone: How long have you been filmmakers, and how did you get started? Filmmakers: While we’ve each had a lifelong interest in film and filmmaking,...
by Staff Writer
2 months ago
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Rotolight has just announced the Titan X2, a 2x1 RGBWW LED light fixture with just about everything you need built in, and with a very modern look that’s sure to impress your client. The brand that became a favorite for its well-made ring lights and circular on-camera lights has...
2 months ago
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In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Sophia You, Executive Producer Samantha Tan, and Creator Jenna Lam guide us through the filming of an episode of Ambitious, a web series about an Asian-American girl who cannot seem to find a place where she feels she belongs. In the final scene of the series’ finale, she placed the two main characters inside a frame within a frame to suggest that...
2 months ago
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In the segment of Show Us Your Shot, Director Roderick E. Stevens and Cinematographer Daniel Gonzalez explored a few options for safely capturing the driving scenes in this road movie, including using a 70" LED TV as a background, before settling on green screen for compositing. This also freed Stevens up to manipulate the art direction and color grading further to create a contrast between the...
Show Us Your Shot: Faking Desert Conditions in Pennsylvania
2 months ago
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In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Jillian Bullock explains how her DP created a desert shot at night, while shooting in Pennsylvania. We had filmed some scenes at the Bill Pickett Riding Academy, in Philadelphia, a horse-riding stable. My DP, Lamont Fountain, and I were there trying to figure out where we could...
3 months ago
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In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, Gregory Blair pays homage to indie horror filmmakers, creating a disorienting feeling without the use of high-tech effects, CGI, or jibs and cranes. “Deadly Revisions is a psychological thriller that pays homage to several horror films and filmmakers. In this scene, we wanted to give a loving nod to Sam Raimi and the Evil Dead films. The scene involves...
3 months ago
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In this segment, Chris Seivard shares with us how he pulled off a professional shoot for a client, using mostly natural daylight streaming through the location’s windows, supplemented with two LED fixtures to light the interior. Watch the video, as Seivard explains his setup, and be sure to study the lighting diagram. This project was for an insurance company. The goal was to give...
3 months ago
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What began as a tool and technique for capturing and projecting wider aspect ratios on 35mm film, anamorphic lenses are a runaway favorite among cinematographers for the unique characteristics they bring to moving images. Ultra-wide rectangular aspect ratios, long horizontal lens flares, and oval bokeh (the out-of-focus areas of the image) now feel as much a part of the cinematic experience as a...
3 months ago
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In Learning to Drive, Director Roderick E. Stevens wanted the camera to drop straight down over the actor, the way it might on a telescopic crane. Without the budget to rent one, that seemed impossible. It’s a simple shot that only lasts a few seconds, but it occurs at a crucial turning point in the film, and the director is far too stubborn to give up. About $150 in electrical conduit and...
Show Us Your Shot: Dolly or Zoom?
4 months ago
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In this segment of Show Us Your Shot, filmmaker Steven Gladstone shares with us the differences between a dolly and a zoom. He begins by recreating a two-dolly combination move using a skateboard dolly and a slider, and then moves on to examine the choice between zoom in and dolly in. “With the small size and lightweight nature of today’s equipment, once-difficult shots become easier to pull off...
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