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Posted 04/17/2019
The first amateur photographic entity in the United States was the Amateur Photographic Exchange Club, New York City, which existed from 1861–1863. The oldest continuously extant camera club in the United States founded, at least in part, by amateurs is the Photographic Society of Philadelphia, founded in 1862. On today’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast we talk about camera clubs and, specifically, the Coney Island School of Photography and Art, which, despite its pedagogic nomenclature, is an amateur camera club that takes the famed oceanfront community and amusement park in Brooklyn, New York, as its subject. For anyone who is familiar with Coney Island, it should be clear that photographing at this beach is less about sunsets and flamingoes and more about “polar bears,” freak shows, and street photography along the beach. We welcome three members of this camera club, Orlando Mendez, A.J. Bernstein, and Norman Blake, to discuss their personal photographic journeys, the benefits of having cohorts with whom to work and compare notes and, of course, the changing face of Coney Island itself. We also take time to talk about gear, technique, the different ways in which photographers will see the same subject, and the simple joy that photography can bring to our lives. Join us for this entertaining episode. Guests: A.J. Bernstein, Norman Blake, and Orlando Mendez © A.J. Bernstein © A.J. Bernstein © A.J. Bernstein © A.J. Bernstein © A.J. Bernstein © Orlando Mendez © Orlando Mendez © Orlando Mendez © Orlando Mendez © Orlando Mendez © Norman Blake © Norman Blake © Norman Blake © Norman Blake © Norman Blake Filming of the 1979 movie, “The Warriors” © Norman Blake Filming of the 1979 movie, “The Warriors” © Norman Blake A.J. Bernstein, Allan Weitz, Orlando Mendez, and Norman Blake © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/10/2019
This is one of the more informative and hands-on practical episodes of the B&H Photography Podcast that we have produced in some time. Obviously, it helps if you are “practicing” car photography, but the insights provided in this episode are useful for a wide range of photo disciplines, and touch on techniques for making better images of moving objects, reflective and non-reflective products, tight interiors, and how to photograph large items in a studio or on location. For this wealth of information, we must thank photographer Nate Hassler, who joined us to talk about his extensive work photographing cars, whether for advertising, editorial, or for personal projects, a.k.a. fun. Hassler is accomplished in each of these areas, and his advertising clients include Toyota, Honda, Lexus, and Mercedes. He is also a respected motorsport photographer, with work appearing regularly in Road & Track magazine. We find out that Hassler grew up around photography, helping in his parents’ photo studio, but developed a love for cars all on his own and seems to have found the perfect career that blends his two passions. We learn a bit about the automobile advertising business, but mostly we discuss capture technique, including the rigs and gear he prefers, shooting moving vehicles, stabilization, bracketing, back-lighting, lens distortion, and post-process. This truly is an educational and entertaining episode, and check out the B&H Photography Podcast Facebook Group for an image of Hassler’s “Franken-Instax” camera that he created to make instant photos with a Schneider lens. Guest: Nate Hassler Photograph © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler “Franken-Instax” camera © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler © Nate Hassler Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 04/03/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome two photographers who are part of the diverse and thriving cultural and artistic life of The Bronx. Rhynna Santos and Michael G. Young are both members of the Bronx Documentary Center and, today, we discuss their individual bodies of work, the role the BDC plays in their lives and community, and we talk a bit about what makes The Bronx so boogie-down. Talk about committed—not only is Rhynna Santos  a documentary photographer creating long-form series on subjects close to her heart, she leads workshops at the BDC, coordinates the Bronx Photo League and curates the Everyday Bronx feed on Instagram. Her current project, #papielmaestro, profiles her father, legendary musician Ray Santos. This series, which is on exhibit at the Bronx Music Heritage Center documents her father’s musical legacy and examines her role as her aging father’s caregiver. Michael Young is primarily a street photographer, but his portrait, event, and street fashion work is so strong, he is hard to pigeon-hole. We talk about his commitment to photography, the ability to take on different styles, and his current project on the people of Claremont Village, a public housing project in The Bronx. With Santos and Young, we discuss the challenges faced by artists of color and those in underserved communities, the value of embracing long-term projects, and how shooting “what you know” with the gear you have is a key to engaged photography. We also take a minute to shout out to a shared mentor, Jamel Shabazz, and the role he has played in the artistic development of their photography, and we profile the Bronx Documentary Center, a non-profit gallery and community-oriented cultural center that offers workshops, lectures, exhibits, and a home base for children, adults, and seniors to get hands-on training in photojournalism, filmmaking, and documentary photography. Join us for this inspirational episode. Guests: Michael G. Young and Rhynna Santos Photograph © Michael G. Young From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos From #papielmaestro © Rhynna Santos NYC Stride © Michael Young Morning Run © Michael Young Being a Father is Everything © Michael Young Untitled © Michael Young Untitled © Michael Young Michael G. Young © John Harris Rhynna Santos © Allan Weitz Allan Weitz, Michael Young, and Rhynna Santos © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/28/2019
Is it necessary to be funny to create work with humor, what is the line between humor and discomfort, can art that is funny have a serious message? How does Instagram success translate to the real world? These are some of the questions we address in this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, and while “humor in art” is our starting point, the conversation takes its own life and we touch on a range of subjects, including the role of Instagram for artists, how to sustain a creative idea, the discrepancy between intent and reception, and how to scale work for both a small screen and a gallery. With these ideas on the table, I cannot think of two better guests with whom to have a conversation. Mitra Saboury and Ben Zank are both artists who explore very personal spheres with their photo and video work, and both incorporate humor and playfulness to express their worldview—and as a portal to explore thornier themes. Ben Zank’s deceptively simple, wonderfully composed images, often with himself as model, explore the body’s relationship with its found environment. Placing a model in a sewer, a pothole, a basketball hoop, or under the yellow lines of the highway, Zank creates an, at times awkward, at times harmonious exchange. The almost self-deprecating humor belies a confident control of purpose and a delicate view of the human form. The imaginative work of Mitra Saboury, whether alone or in collaboration with Meatwreck, explores the physical and psychological effects of our quotidian toils. Like Zank, there is much humor in her work, but a persistent challenging of norms and questioning of beliefs runs through her photography, video, performance, and installation art. Some pieces are discomforting, but strength through inquiry and vulnerability lay at their core. Her work has been exhibited throughout the world, most recently at the Spring Break Art Fair, in Los Angeles, but she also thrives on Instagram and encourages audience participation, whether in person or in the semi-anonymity of the Web. Join us for this interesting conversation, organized by Cory Rice, and check out his portrait of Ben Zank in our “What is Photography?” series. Guests: Mitra Saboury, Ben Zank, Cory Rice Snackbreak © Meatwreck Wavy © Meatwreck Cheescake © Meatwreck Nail Spa © Mitra Saboury Found Face © Mitra Saboury Soap Sink © Mitra Saboury 355 © Ben Zank Daily Commute © Ben Zank Bottleneck © Ben Zank Nuclear Witness © Ben Zank Ben Zank © John Harris Mitra Saboury © John Harris Mitra Saboury, Allan Weitz, Ben Zank, and Cory Rice © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/20/2019
This week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast is a bit of a grab bag. We start with an update of our new B&H Photography Podcast Facebook group and announce the winners of the SanDisk 64GB memory card sweepstakes. We also discuss the enthusiastic support we received during the first week of the new group and give a shout out to some of the individuals who have submitted images and comments. We then have a quick chat among ourselves about our photography New Year’s resolutions to see how (and if) we are following through with our plans. We also discuss some of the gear we were interested in at that time and update whether that was a true photographic need or just G.A.S. On the second half of the show, we offer excerpts from conversations with photographers Tomaiya Colvin and Tony Gale. Colvin is a photographer from Houston who has made a career shooting senior portraits, while Gale is a portrait photographer, lighting expert, and Sony Artisan of Light. We discuss some of the trends in senior portraiture with Colvin, as well as her choice of gear, and she provides a dose of real-world motivation for photographers of all stripes. Tony Gale speaks about his blend of corporate and editorial portrait work, as well as his series on women mayors. He also discusses his switch to mirrorless cameras and the lighting systems he uses on his various shoots. Join us for this easygoing episode and subscribe to our podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or Overcast, and join the B&H Photography Podcast Facebook group. Guests: Tomaiya Colvin and Tony Gale Salman Rushdie, 2017 © Tony Gale Betsy Price, Mayor of Fort Worth, Texas, 2018 © Tony Gale Anne Huntington, 2018 © Tony Gale High School Senior Portrait © Tomaiya Colvin High School Senior Portrait © Tomaiya Colvin High School Senior Portrait © Tomaiya Colvin Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/13/2019
Today, we welcome portrait photographer Mark Mann to the B&H Photography Podcast  and, as Allan notes at the top of the show, if you name a celebrity or famous politician, Mann has probably photographed them. His body of work is incredible. As an example, in 2014, he was tapped by Esquire to photograph eighty boys and men, from age one to eighty, for its 80th anniversary issue. That “who’s-who” list alone would make a career, and it was just one year for Mann. Over the course of this engaging conversation, we touch on many topics, from interaction with subjects, to gear choices (Leica medium format S and full-frame SL systems), to retouching, to shooting with or without a tripod. We also dig into his early career, when he assisted legends like Nick Knight and Miles Aldridge and what he calls the “slow grind” of years of freelance work. While Mann is known for tight-cropped, high-resolution portraits, we also discuss his motion and After Effects work, how he “grounds” himself by occasionally shooting with a Graflex and antique lenses and, of course, the development of his signature lighting techniques. Also joining us is Cory Rice, who photographed Mann as part of the What is Photography? portrait series and asks pertinent questions on portraiture. Our conversation is loaded with belly laughs as Mann recounts his portrait sessions with Bill Murray, Robin Williams, President Obama, and others. Join us for this enjoyable and informative episode and don’t forget to join the B&H Photography Facebook group. Guest: Mark Mann and Cory Rice Bill Murray © Mark Mann Danai Gurira © Mark Mann George Carlin © Mark Mann Gillian Anderson © Mark Mann Jennifer Aniston © Mark Mann Robin Williams © Mark Mann Snoop Dogg © Mark Mann Allan Weitz, Mark Mann, and Cory Rice © John Harris Mark Mann © John Harris Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 03/06/2019
The name kinda says it all, doesn’t it? On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we speak with legendary rock ’n’ roll photographer Mick Rock. Despite his incredible body of work and numerous iconic photos, Rock’s philosophy on photography might best be summed up with a comment from this episode, “The reality is, it’s not that complicated.” For this episode we traveled to Rock’s home studio, and he graciously invited this “dodgy-looking bunch” in to talk about the beginning of his career, his working style, the bio-documentary “SHOT! The Psycho-Spiritual Mantra of Rock,” and the many photos and album covers he created for the likes of Syd Barrett, David Bowie, Lou Reed, Blondie, Queen, Rory Gallagher, Joan Jett, and others. We also discussed his recent work with Lana Del Rey, Karen O, the GUCCI brand, and how he approaches an advertising campaign compared to a rock ’n’ roll shoot.    Our conversation casually bounced between topics, but often returned to Rock’s ability to grasp the photographic moment, whether that moment be in a studio, at a concert or, as in many of his most intriguing images, while hanging out with the musicians offstage. Rock downplays his technical skills, but we do talk a bit about gear and, when pressed on how he could create four decades of memorable music photos, he stated, “I’ve always loved my subjects.” The same can be said about us, so please tune in for this wonderful conversation. Guest: Mick Rock Photograph © Mick Rock The views and opinions expressed in this podcast are those of the individual guests and do not necessarily represent the views of B&H Photo. The salty language and rock ’n’ roll content may offend some. Listen at your own discretion. David Bowie, 1973 © Mick Rock David Bowie, 1972 © Mick Rock David Bowie, 2002 © Mick Rock Debbie Harry, 1978 © Mick Rock Queen, 1974 © Mick Rock Syd Barrett, 1969 © Mick Rock Lou Reed, 1972 © Mick Rock David Bowie, Iggy Pop, Lou Reed, Dorchester Hotel, London, 1972 © Mick Rock Lou Reed, Mick Jagger, David Bowie, Café Royal, London, 1973 © Mick Rock David Bowie and Mick Ronson on train to Aberdeen, 1973 © Mick Rock Iggy Pop, 1972 © Mick Rock Mick Rock and the B&H Photography Podcast Team, 2018 © Maria Perez Previous Pause Next
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Posted 02/28/2019
On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we welcome representatives from SanDisk, Lexar, and B&H writer John-Paul Palescandolo to discuss memory cards, storage solutions, and best practices for capturing and storing digital images. We have also officially launched our B&H Photography Facebook Group and invite our listeners to join. Follow the link above to the group page and request to join—it’s as simple as that. We have added a small incentive: we will be giving away SanDisk 64GB Extreme PRO UHS-I SDXC Memory Cards. Everyone who joins our Facebook group by March 13 will be eligible to win, and we will draw two winners at random to receive a card, generously provided by SanDisk. We start our conversation today with Pete Isgrigg, from the Channel Marketing team at Western Digital. Western Digital is the parent company of G-Technology and SanDisk, and we speak with Isgrigg about the products they offer, as well as some basic best practices for memory card and hard drive usage.  After our conversation with Isgrigg, we welcome Andrew Nahmias, from NTI sales, representing Lexar. Nahmias provides further insight into which cards are best for your workflow and how to keep your image files safe and retrievable. We spoke with Isgrigg and Nahmias at the 2019 Depth of Field Wedding and Portrait Photography Conference, but after a short break, we’re joined in our studio by John-Paul Palescandolo to discuss other brands of memory cards sold by B&H, and to answer some general questions on the subject. Join us for this very informative episode—and don’t forget to join the B&H Photography Podcast Facebook Group. Guests: Pete Isgrigg, Andrew Nahmias, and John-Paul Palescandolo   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/20/2019
We’re not even two months into 2019 and there have already been several announcements for new cameras, lenses, and even a new format for a major camera manufacturer. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we list the many new announcements and, along with our guests, Shawn Steiner and Andrea Ortado, offer any insights we have in terms of specs, hands-on comparisons, and general opinions. We begin with the new Canon EOS RP Mirrorless Digital Camera and mention a few of the many lenses on the road map for this new full-frame mirrorless series. We also discuss the new Nikon lenses for its full-frame mirrorless Z-mount camera, including the NIKKOR Z 14-30mm f/4 S lens and the NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/2.8 S lens. From Canon and Nikon, we move on to Panasonic, and the huge announcement of its full-frame mirrorless cameras, the Lumix DC-S1 Mirrorless Digital Camera and the Lumix DC-S1R Mirrorless Digital Camera, as well as the company's L-Mount Alliance with Sigma and Leica, and new lenses such as the Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro O.I.S. lens, the Lumix S PRO 70-200mm f/4 O.I.S. lens, and the Lumix S PRO 50mm f/1.4 lens. We also highlight the impressive new Olympus flagship camera, the OM-D E-M1X Mirrorless Digital Camera. After a break, we discuss the new Sony Alpha a6400 Mirrorless Digital Camera and the reasons it will appeal to vloggers, and the new FUJIFILM X-T30 Mirrorless Digital Camera. FUJIFILM also announced a new XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR lens and the FUJIFILM GF 100-200mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR lens for its medium format GFX cameras. We continue with a brief chat on new point-and-shoot cameras, including the Ricoh GR III Digital Camera, the Panasonic Lumix DC-FZ1000 II Digital Camera, and the FUJIFILM FinePix XP140 Digital Camera. Finally, we close with a brief comment on firmware, accessories such as the Wacom Cintiq 16HD Creative Pen Display, and thoughts on the new full-frame mirrorless cameras. Join us for this very informative episode. Guests: Andrea Ortado and Shawn Steiner Allan Weitz, Shawn Steiner, and Andrea Ortado John Harris   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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Posted 02/13/2019
The wedding-photography business is very competitive, so to have a distinct client base and a way to stand out from the crowd is crucial—almost necessary. On this week’s episode of the B&H Photography Podcast, we discuss niche wedding photography with three photographers who have forged a career path by photographing the weddings of a specific niche demographic. To be clear, each of these photographers shoot weddings for all ilks, but they have been able to distinguish themselves by embracing a specific market. We discuss how each of them discovered their photographic specialty, the importance of understanding traditions while balancing demands of new generations, specific tips for photographing within their areas of expertise, and how incorporating and embracing their own life stories helped find their career path. In the first half of the show, we are joined by Charmi Peña and Petronella Lugemwa, with whom we spoke at the 2019 Depth of Field Wedding and Portrait Conference. Peña is a Nikon Ambassador and a wedding and portrait photographer who specializes in photographing Indian weddings. Lugemwa runs a New York-based, international wedding photography studio whose embrace of “multi-cultural weddings” echoes her personal celebration of her cultural identity. After a break, we speak with portrait and wedding photographer Steven Rosen, who is featured in our “What is Photography?” series. His impeccable portraiture informs his wedding work, and our conversation concentrates on Rosen’s work photographing same-sex weddings. Join us for this compelling episode, which blends personal motivations with practical tips. Guests: Charmi Peña, Petronella Lugemwa, Steven Rosen © Charmi Peña © Charmi Peña © Charmi Peña © Charmi Peña © Charmi Peña © Petronella Photography © Petronella Photography © Petronella Photography © Petronella Photography © Petronella Photography © Steven Rosen © Steven Rosen © Steven Rosen © Steven Rosen © Steven Rosen Charmi Peña © John Harris Petronella Lugemwa and Allan Weitz © John Harris Steven Rosen, outtake from “What is Photography?” © Cory Rice Previous Pause Next   Host: Allan Weitz Senior Creative Producer: John Harris Senior Producer: Jason Tables Executive Producer: Lawrence Neves
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