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Posted 10/20/21
DJI has just announced the Ronin 4D, the brand’s newest line of professional cameras for the next generation of cinema production, featuring two all-in-one 4-axis gimbal cameras: the Ronin 4D 8K Cinema Camera and the Ronin 4D 6K Cinema Camera. The Ronin 4D’s modular system is made up of a core processing unit and a gimbal camera featuring DJI’s flagship Zenmuse X9 sensor and the new DJI CineCore 3.0 image processing system with DCCS (DJI Cinema Color System). The core cameras can be built out with a variety of mix-and-match accessories, depending on your production needs in the studio or on location. DJI Ronin 4D The compact camera features a built-in gimbal that installs on the arm of the main unit, and it adds a fourth Z-axis to the traditional 3-axis configuration for additional stability in motion, particularly during dolly movement, to prevent vertical shake. The gimbal provides multiple visual sensors, an IMU (inertia/force sensor), and a barometer to keep the camera rock steady. Its AMF (Automated Manual Focus) technology provides accurate autofocus while also allowing the camera operator to control focus at any time during the automated process. Ronin 4D 6K Cinema Camera Ronin 4D 8K Cinema Camera On the inside, the Ronin 4D provides either the Zenmuse X9 8K sensor that can capture up to 8K75 video with 800/4000 dual native ISOs or the Zenmuse X9 6K sensor that can capture up to 6K60 or 4K120 video with 800/5000 dual native ISO. The CineCore 3.0 image processing system allows the camera to record ProRes RAW, 422 HQ, and H.264 formats internally; it utilizes ActiveTrack Pro for tracking shots, and both sensors feature an advertised 14+ stops of dynamic range. The full 8192 x 4320 resolution features crisp detail that can be cropped to 4K, re-centered, and stabilized in post, retaining the same high-quality imagery. Other features of the camera include built-in 9-stop ND filters, HDMI and SDI outputs, and a DL lens mount to support a variety of full-frame, carbon-fiber lenses, which will be available in the near future. The DL mount also allows for interchangeable lens mounts such as Leica M and Sony E-mount that provide zoom, macro, and anamorphic options for your production. The camera can record internally using a built-in CFexpress Type-B slot on the main body, and it also features a USB 3.1 Type-C port to record externally to a 1TB PROSSD. It records on-board audio using the 3.5mm and XLR input connectors on the main body. Since the design is modular, there are numerous accessory options available to add to the camera to complete your rig, including a top handle, X9 focus motor, high-bright monitor, and focus/pan/tilt handgrips. An expansion plate can be added to provide an SDI port, XLR input, and timecode. An optional wireless transmitter uses DJI’s O3 wireless video technology, allowing you to monitor up to 1080p60 video from the camera up to 20,000' away over 2.4 and 5.8 GHz DFS frequencies using secure AES-256 encryption. 1TB PROSSD High-Bright Monitor LiDAR Range Finder With the optional LiDAR Range Finder, you can focus accurately using an intuitive waveform, which can detect up to 43,200 points within a 33' range with varying surface textures and subtle light changes to provide autofocus and ActiveTrack Pro, working with an enormous amount of data. The camera is powered either from a DC power input or from a high-capacity TB50 battery, which can provide up to 2 hours of shoot time. Questions or comments? Post them in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 10/14/21
Our video team tests the DZOFilm VESPID Prime Lens Kit, which is well-suited for filmmaking productions, ranging from independent to studio. These affordable cinema lenses boast impressive build quality, versatile mount-ability, and stunning cinematic image quality. Have you used any of these lenses? Share your experiences below in the Comments section!
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Posted 10/11/21
Nanlite has announced the PavoTube II 15x and 30x RGBWW LED Pixel Tubes, updating the popular fixtures to include pixel-based special effects, DMX compatibility, boosted output, better diffusion, a stronger housing, and revamped app control. An on-location favorite, these portable lights can provide a splash of color, match ambient light, or be used to build up a lighting environment from scratch. The 15x is 24" and the 30x is 48" in length. PavoTube II 15x (left) and 30x (right) The second-gen PavoTube offers an expanded color temperature range of 2700-12000K with green to magenta adjustment and a CRI of 96 and TLCI of 98 for precise and accurate output. Additionally, full-spectrum RGB hue and saturation controls allow you to further tweak output to get the exact desired effect. Speaking of effects, in addition to the 15 practical effects introduced with its predecessor, the new light includes 10 new pixel-based effects, including: Hue Loop, CCT Loop, INT Loop, Multi-Color, Gradient, Scrolling, Marching, Flame, Rainbow, and Driving. Other updates include an upgraded control pack with locking buttons, enhanced app control, and DMX compatibility. A larger illumination area produces brighter output from the new light, as well as more uniform diffusion. The PavoTube II also features an updated metal housing, adding to its durability and prolonging life on set. Three ¼"-20 receivers provide a range of mounting possibilities. Lithium-ion batteries provide up to 1 hour and 26 minutes (15x) or 1 hour and 36 minutes (30x) at full brightness with a recharge time of 2 hours or 2 hours and 40 minutes, respectively, via an included AC adapter. Accompanying the new lights is a handful of accessories, including waterproof housings, fabric barndoors, and a foldable floor stand. The lights are available individually or as multi-light kits. PavoTube II 15x Kit PavoTube II 30x Kit Do you have experience working with LED tubes? Share your thoughts on the new PavoTube II in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 10/05/21
Luxli has added another instrument to its “symphony of light” with the new Cello 2 compact 10" on-camera LED light, and I was happy to get my hands on it to light a few scenes. At first glance, the light has basically the same form factor as the original Cello light, it comes with a shoe mount and L-series NP-F750 battery like the original, but the Cello 2 also includes a USB Type-C cable and power adapter, rather than a battery charger. The USB Type-C port on the Cello 2 has been updated to allow charging, while the previous model’s micro-USB port was only for firmware updates (you can now update the Cello 2 firmware via the Composer app). The advantage of this update is that you can power the light and charge the battery at the same time. It also retains a DC power input if you have a 7 to 15V adapter, allowing you to also utilize external batteries and plates with a DC output. Cello2 with adjustable shoe mount The light is easy to start up right out of the box, and I set it up with the included shoe mount on my camera. The mount is made of metal, which holds the light steady with easy adjustments. It is also very easy to pop onto a tripod or light stand using the ¼"-20 thread on the bottom. I plugged in the power adapter, and the instructions in the box, as well as on the back LED screen, state very clearly that the light requires a minimum voltage and a PD 3.0 compatible adapter, so it’s best to stick with the original adapter in the box when using the USB Type-C input. Or you can always power it using the DC input or install the included L-series battery in the slot on the back. Contents of box Also in the box is a custom photometrics sheet for this particular light―not the model line, the actual light in your box tied to the serial number, which is a handy detail on Luxli lights not found with many LED products. If you are a calibration nerd and want to ensure the color gamut, beam angle, lux vs kelvin, or Planckian locus derivations are accurate, you’ve got all the information you need. It even lists what instrument was used to calibrate the light, so the lumen heads among us can geek out some more. Another update from the original Cello is the array of 176 5-die LEDs (as opposed to 4-die in the original Cello), which feature all five colors (Red, Green, Blue, Amber, and White) in a single LED package (or die), making it easier to mix colors more efficiently, as well as to cut down on the number of LEDs installed in the light to keep it compact and require less power. Also according to Luxli, it features 20% brighter output, lower power usage, and an expanded color temperature range from a minimum of 3000K on the original Cello to 2800 to 10,000K on the Cello 2, which gives you even more choice when setting your CCT levels. Photometrics chart in the box Back display The Cello 2 is very light, weighing less than a pound, but when you add the included NP-F750 battery or another high-capacity pack, it can get a bit weighty even for the durable shoe mount (1.4 lb by my home scale). That’s why it is a great advantage to offload the power to a pro battery or other source, so you can keep that weight down when using it in a mobile setting. The NP-F750 lasts about two hours with constant use, but if you need more batteries for the light for longer shooting days, additional Watson Li-ion packs such as the NP-F975 or NP-F770 are just fine to pop onto the back of the light and charge using the USB input. Composer App CCT mode Turning on the light is easy. There are two buttons on the bottom of the light just under the LED. The power button is inset, so it can’t be pressed accidentally and can be easily distinguished from the other button by touch, which is a nice feature. The other button allows you to select the options when you use the knobs next to the LED for the different light modes, levels, and brightness. The modes are set up in the same way as on the original Cello model with HSL mode, CCT mode, Effects mode, and RGB mode, and it features easily selectable gels to mix and match. Both knobs are redesigned for easier adjustment, allowing you to change settings smoothly in 1% increments, so you have seemingly unlimited color options. When you want to inject even more personality into your scenes, the ten lighting effects, such as Color or CCT chase, Explosion, Fire, Fireworks, Lightning, Paparazzi, Pulse, Siren, and Strobe, are fun to customize. Composer App light effects For more complexity and control, Luxli highly recommends downloading the free Luxli Composer app for iOS and Android. I tried the app on iOS and Android phones, and it installs and operates on both without an issue. The updated Bluetooth 5 connection is fast and instant, and once you have it enabled (the instruction sheet tells you how to enable it out of the box), you can use it from up to 100' away, which is great when shooting in a large area while controlling several lights. The controls respond instantly, and it allows you to navigate the settings in a much more organized way than on the tiny LED screen on the back of the light. Bluetooth connection setup on Composer app Like all other Luxli lights in the “symphony,” the Composer app also allows you to add the Cello 2 to a group so you can control all your lights, no matter what the Luxli model, from a single location. It makes everything easier to control—mix different settings, save different modes, even see the light view from your smartphone camera―basically acting as your central lighting console. I found using the app much easier and intuitive to navigate than the buttons, much better on my eyes, and there is no delay whatsoever in wireless response. However, if you are not using the app and Bluetooth setting on the Cello2, I would recommend turning off Bluetooth to conserve the battery, since Bluetooth can be a power drain. Cello2 mounted on Canon 5D Mark III There are also handy, custom-made accessories available for the Cello 2, which include a barndoor set and a diffuser hood. The barndoor kit snaps right onto the light and the diffuser hood secures using a magnet, making it easy to take them on and off when needed. The diffuser hood creates a noticeably softer output, and the four-way barndoors perform as they are designed, to cut light from four sides with individual adjustment on each side. Overall, the new Cello 2 is a powerful light with color output that rates at CRI 97/TLCI 97 at 3200K and CRI 97/TLCI 98 at 5600K, which are high scores on the accuracy scale. I was also impressed with the brightness output (which shows 1500 lux at ~3' on the photometrics sheet), and the versatility of color mixing and the response of the controls were a breeze to work with. It’s a light that can definitely find its way into my kit for mobile production, vlogging, a sit-down interview, or even a studio shoot. Is the Luxli Cello 2  the right light for your production? Share your thoughts and any questions you may have in the Comments section.
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Posted 10/06/21
The compact cinema camera market has become even more competitive with the announcement of Panasonic’s new Lumix BS1H box-style camera that sports a long list of professional features in a tiny form factor. This mirrorless camera joins the S1H and BGH1 compact camera line, featuring a full-frame 24.2MP CMOS sensor that captures cinema-quality video up to 10-bit 6K24 resolution, 14+ stops of advertised dynamic range using V-Log/V-Gamut, and dual-native ISO. Its miniature size still finds room for multiple output and recording options via SD card, HDMI, SDI, USB tether, and IP streaming output. Panasonic’s Lumix BS1H The tiny BS1H camera weighs only 1.3 lb and measures just 3.7" square, so it can be used in any environment such as sporting events, live broadcast, Internet streaming, presentations, or any production situation that calls for a small form factor and cinema resolution. The camera can be placed just about everywhere using its Ethernet and PoE compatible design, features an L-mount for cinema-style lenses, and it supports IS boost when using Lumix S Series OIS lenses. Its Contrast AF technology supports face and eye recognition, precise object tracking, and high-precision focus in low-light situations. The camera allows you to output RAW video such as ProRes RAW and Blackmagic RAW via the HDMI output for use with recording monitors such as the Atomos Ninja V or the Blackmagic Video Assist 12G, so you can record up to 5.9K video externally. It also features an SDI output and an RJ45 LAN port so you can livestream video to the Internet using RTP/RTSP streaming protocols. The USB port can be used for camera control, as well as tethering, allowing you to use the Lumix Tether software for remote control and JPEG still capture. The camera records in MOV and MP4 formats in H.264/AVC or H.265/HEVC to the integrated SD/SDHC/SDXC slot using up to V90 or UHS-II class 90 cards at up to 400 Mb/s. The BS1H's extensive feature list also includes anti-reflective coating on the sensor, manual or autofocus modes, and exposure compensation to boost performance in low light. It has customizable color temperature, white balance, shutter speed, RGB, timecode, genlock, and luma settings, as well as front and rear tally lights. Additionally, it supports 4-perf anamorphic squeeze, VariCam and.Cube LUT formats, high-frame-rate (HFR) recording, hybrid log gamma (HLG), and many more professional image tools and control options. The camera also features a 3.5mm mic/line audio input, and it is compatible with the Panasonic DMW-XLR1  XLR input extension to make professional audio recording easy. The BS1H comes with a power adapter and can utilize a separately available Li-ion AG-VBR battery to power the camera on the go. It can even be powered using PoE+ when you have a third-party PoE+ switch, saving you a battery and extra cabling. Is the Lumix BS1H right for you? Which features do you find most compelling? Join us in conversation in the Comments section.
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Posted 09/03/21
Director and VFX Artist Cache Bunny shares her advice for video content creators, especially those who are just starting out, such as how to build a strong community, how to overcome your fear of creating content, and more. What are your questions about video creation? Post them in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 09/05/21
B&H’s video team tests the Accsoon CineEye 2 and CineEye 2S Pro Wireless Video Transmitters, going over the specs and exploring the latency and range. Both of these transmitters allow flexibility on set, since they allow you to transmit up to 1080p60 video and monitor your camera on your phone. Questions or comments? Post them in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 09/08/21
DJI is expanding its family of motorized smartphone video stabilizers with the newly announced OM 5 Smartphone Gimbal. The OM 5 succeeds last year’s OM 4 as the new DJI flagship stabilizer, bringing with it across-the-board improvements to its hardware and software, as well as adding some brand-new features. DJI OM 5 Smartphone Gimbal New to the OM 5 is a built-in 215mm extension rod that allows users to capture footage from farther away and effectively doubles as a selfie stick. Even better: The OM 5 manages to incorporate this extension rod without compromising the same size, weight, and foldability that made the OM 4 so popular. In fact, the folded and unfolded footprint of the OM 5 is smaller than the folded and unfolded footprint of its predecessor. The new design also incorporates metal joints to enhance durability, so you can add “more rugged” to its list of improvements. On the software side of things, DJI used the OM 5 to introduce its new ShotGuides feature. Primarily designed for new users, ShotGuides automatically recognizes your surrounding environment and recommends helpful shooting tips and creative templates. Existing software features, such as ActiveTrack 4.0, were also improved. Highly regarded for its ability to track human subjects accurately, the newly updated ActiveTrack 4.0 not only improves the OM 5’s recognition capabilities, but it also now allows users to track pets accurately, as well.   Shot on DJI OM 5 Along with the new and improved features, many of the fan-favorite shooting modes remain, including DynamicZoom, SpinShot, Timelaps, CloneMe Pano, and more. You'll be able to order the OM 5 in traditional Athens Gray or a new Sunset White. Will you be picking up an OM 5 to upgrade your current setup? Perhaps you're a new user wondering how this can fit into your workflow? Check out our product page for more details and be sure to let us know what you think of the OM 5 in the Comments section, below!
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Posted 08/20/21
If you’re looking for a beginner filmmaking camera, it might be in your hands right now. Create amazing, cinematic footage using your own smartphone! Full-time filmmaker and director Andy To teaches you how to shoot cinematic video with your phone, discussing topics such as which frame rates to choose and what equipment to use. Tell us about your experience applying Andy’s tips, in the Comments section, below.
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Posted 08/17/21
Canon is excited to announce the XF605, the company’s new 4K, 10-bit camcorder, packed with useful features for professional productions ranging from live event to ENG, sports, studio, as well as narrative and location shoots. Slightly smaller than the XF705, the XF605 uses a 1" CMOS sensor to capture 4:2:2 10-bit UHD 4K video in MP4 and XF-AVC, for incredibly sharp video. It also captures Full HD at up to 120 fps, for slow-motion effects, and it records to two SD card slots, providing a variety of recording options from relay to instant backup. Use the camera for simultaneous 4K live output via its 12G-SDI and HDMI output ports, or take advantage of its USB-Type C port to connect it to any computer as if it were a webcam, providing simple streaming options without needing a separate encoder. The camcorder also supports the XFT iPhone app, turning it into a mobile production system. Canon XF605 The XF605 features an integrated 15x optical zoom Canon L lens, equivalent to a 25.5 to 382.5mm in 35mm, for getting in tight to your subject. The lens has three individual rings for controlling focus, zoom, and iris, so no need to flip a switch to select which function to control; just grab the ring you need on the lens directly, or use the camcorder’s built-in servo lens function. The XF605 supports Dual Pixel CMOS AF, pioneered in its high-end Cinema EOS series of cameras, and adds Eye AF to lock focus on your subject’s eye―keeping the attention on your subject and not drifting around the frame. Additionally, it supports EOS iTR AF X (also known as head detection), which will track focus with your subject as they move even should they turn their face away from the camera and walk away. Adding to its flexibility, the XF605 allows you to select the color matrix in which you wish to work, including the CINEMA EOS color matrix, for better matching and less time spent in post when using other Canon cameras on the same production. The LCD viewfinder supports HDR and features the Direct Touch Control menu that was introduced on the EOS C70, for fast adjustments. Frame and Interval recording modes offer you choices in creating time-lapse effects, while a new multifunction accessory shoe allows you to record four channels of audio via an optional XLR audio interface unit, for clean audio from multiple XLR sources. An exciting addition to the Canon XF lineup, the XF605 build brings new features and options that make it a great all-around camera that can be used on a vast array of productions, from studio and narrative work to streaming and mobile production. Plus, the XF605 works nicely with Canon’s EOS lineup of cameras, as well as the cameras in the XF series, making it easy to use it in a three-camera production. Are you looking forward to working with the XF605? Share your thoughts below, in the Comments section.
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